Saturday, 29 August 2015

SACRED SUNDAY AUGUST 30, REVIEW CH4 LIVE YESTERDAY. PLUS SOME RACING POST FEATURES THIS WEEK FROM MONDAY AUGUST 24, TO SUNDAY AUGUST 30.

Image result for SMALL IRISH FLAG TO COPY




PENDLETON'S PROGRESS 

http://www.sportinglife.com/racing/report/690700/pendleton-second-on-debut



 
SUNDAY AUGUST 30, LIVE CH4. RACING POST 2015 
Week Monday August 24, to Sunday August 30
CH4 HORSERACING TEAM
 Taking a Closer look at Global Horseracing:
A work in progress guide.
Start your adventure journey into horseracing today:
The clues are here, but can you spot them?
Sponsored by Dubai 
 High Definition

TODAY'S EQUUS CARDS
http://www.racingpost.com/horses2/cards/home.sd  

RACING POST PREVIEW 



RACING REVIEW  RESULTS.

PAUSE FOR THOUGHT FACT NOT FICTION:
RACING POST
Week Monday August 24, to Sacred Sunday August 30.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 26, RACING POST 2015. NICHOLAS GODFREY BRINGS US THE


FIRST OF A THREE PART SERIES:

EPSOM PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.
1947 - 2015
EPSOM PAST THE GLORY YEARS:
 “In the first of a three-part series Nicholas Godfrey rolls back the years to when Epsom was in it’s heyday as a training centre, pages 8-9.

JMC: FLAT TURF: (GB) 1947:
Stanley Wootton owned 18 of 27 winners trained by Staff Ingham in 1947.
"Stanley Wootton has proved to be the best tutor of jockeys in the 20th century. "



EPSOM PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.
1947 - 2015


THURSDAY: PETER THOMAS: AND STEVE DENNIS


Part 2 of 3 
"ON HOW EPSOM IS STRUGGLING FOR SURVIVAL . "
1947 - 2015

 “An ace set of gallops with a nice racecourse attached. "

Steve Dennis spends a work morning alongside the Epsom training fraternity. You’d be

amazed by what’s on the other side of the fence.

"What we have here is an ace set of gallops with quite a nice racecourse attached. The
famously undulating circuit over which the greatest Flat race in the world is run commands
all the attention, all eyes fixed on the twisting, turning green ribbon that has bewitched the
racing world since 1780. And no one sees what’s on the other side of the fence. Whybrow  47,
says: “There are 640 acres of gallops here, Epsom training grounds.
Manager since 2005, when he made the choice between looking after the racecourse and looking after the gallops, a job he had combined for the previous 11 years.

  "Behind the screening trees, before you get to the computer-belt jostle of Tadworth’s homes
and gardens, the ground falls gently away in tiers of grass gallops, all the way to a girdling
Polytrack strip at the foot of the hill. Epsom Downs is the racecourse; these are the Walton
Downs, downland  gallops that haven’t seen a plough since before King Charles lost his
head, beautiful, springy turf, lent lushless by the biblical downpours just in time for Lee
  Carter’s horses to come cantering along two-by-two, Noah-style. Today is not a serious
work morning, just a pipe opener time for the 160 or so horses trained from the 11 yards that
comprise Epsom’s stable strength. 
“Nigel Whybrow turns on the windscreen wipers, it being a typical summer morning, turns off the inner racecourse road at the mile pole and crosses over into a secret world. "
1.     JMC: Could this be the secret world explored by Alice in Wonderland? If not, what else could it be?  You may well ask. CLUE: Anything to do with the senses? What particular senses? How do you communicate so accurately with these most beautiful of all creatures to achieve such highly athletic success together, worldwide?


2.     What is it that needs to be done to bring Epsom’s fabulous horseracing facility back to life again? "an educational foundation where creative talents can be discovered and
       developed, and where one can spread culture through the teaching of crafts and the
       preservation of knowledge that might otherwise be destroyed or forgotten".


3.    Is Britain in danger of losing the true skills that bind global horseracing together?
        What are Newmarket, Malton, Lambourn, Lewis and Malborough doing to protect their rich horseracing history?  History pieced together over the last four centuries by true bloodhorse literate horsemen and horsewomen who have battled bloodhorse illiteracy against all the odds, over all this time.

 STANLEY WOOTTON ACHIEVED TRUE BLOODHORSE LITERACY IN HIS OWN RIGHT:
  STAFF INGHAM ACHIEVED TRUE BLOODHORSE LITERACY IN HIS OWN RIGHT: 
EDWARD JAMES BLOODHORSE ILLITERATE. BUT WELL AWARE THAT COUNTRY  
SKILLS NEED MINDING.

1.      West Dean College 


3.    West Dean College is situated in the 6,350-acre West Dean Estate, of West Dean near Chichester. The Estate was formerly the home of the poet and patron of the arts, Edward JamesWikipedia


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_James
Edward William Frank James (1907–1984) was a British poet known for his patronage of
the surrealist art movement.
o    Surrealism ·
o    New Mexico ·
o    Las Pozas ·
o    West Dean
7.     The St Roche's Arboretum at West Dean
8.    In 1964, James gave his English estate which included West Dean House at West Dean to a charitable trust. The Edward James Foundation comprises West Dean College, a centre for the preservation of traditional arts and crafts, through short courses and full-time Diplomas and MAs. One of only two professional Tapestry Weaving studios in the UK, an Art Gallery are all housed on a 6,400-acre (26 km2) estate which is open to the public through the West Dean Gardens.

9.    West Dean College is part of the Edward James Foundation set up in 1971 in response to James' vision of establishing "an educational foundation where creative talents can be discovered and developed, and where one can spread culture through the teaching of crafts and the preservation of knowledge that might otherwise be destroyed or forgotten".

FRIDAY: AUGUST 28  STEVE DENNIS WRITES:
Part 3 or 3
“An ace set of gallops with a nice racecourse attached. "
“Steve Dennis spends a work morning alongside the Epsom training fraternity. You’d be amazed by what’s on the other side of the fence.

Steve Dennis recalls the greatest amateur race ever to be run, the 1974 Moet & Chandon
Silver Magnum, more commonly known as the amateurs’ Derby.

“IT READS a little like one of those fiendish quiz questions with which John Randall tests
Racing Post readers each Christmas. What race involved a duel Champion Hurdle winner,
the best racing journalist ever to file copy, the trainer of the best Flat horse of  all time, a
Spanish nobleman with a tendency for breakages, two duel Derby-winning trainers and the
first man to ride 1,000 winners over jumps, among several other racing celebrities.

 
“The answer is the 1974 Moet & Chandon Silver Magnum at Epsom, the accompanying racecard showing the glittering cast-list in full. Sea Pigeon, John Oaksey, Henry Cecil, the Duke of  Albuquerque, Luca Cumani, John Dunlop and Stan Mellor are the answers to the above questions, with Nicky Henderson, Bruce Hobbs, Denys Smith, Jim Wilson, Gordon Richards and Clive Brittain all in the mix in a quite remarkable renewal of what was known as the Amateurs’ Derby, run over the Classic course and distance as the centrepiece of the August bank holiday meeting at Epsom.

“An amateur race is still to be found on the card but these days it pales in comparison with its former self, just another 0-85 handicap without the panache or prestige-or, considering the sponsor, the fizz-of its previous incarnation. As the City and Suburban and the Great Metropolitan Epsom’s historic handicaps that have lost much of their luster, so it goes for the Silver Magnum, its golden age in the past. Not forgotten, though. Far from it. That race marked my last ride, and I went out on a winner," says Phillip Mitchell, four-time winner,
of the Silver Magnum and partner of the Robert Armstrong-trained  Laurentian Hills, half length winner on that rose –tinted afternoon 41 years ago.
 “I won the Moet in 1967 on Patron Saint, then the following year on Inishmaan. A few years later there was New Member – he was probably the biggest certainty I ever sat on, the hardest thing about that race was pulling him up after he’d crossed the line – and then I rode Laurentian Hills to beat Sea Pigeon."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Oaksey
"Young Freddie Mitchell doing well, choosing the Fegentri amateur route. Freddie's father says, "It might seem all a long time ago, but this is the connection between past and present bringing the amateur rider narrative up to date through the exploits of Philip's son Freddie, who was Fegentri (anglicised as the International Federation of Gentlemen and Lady Riders) world champion  in 2013. Mitchell snr participated in the Fegentri  'grand tour' in his latter years as a rider and was overjoyed that his son took the same path.

"I told my other son Jack that he had to go the Fegenti route  but he became an apprentice instead, so when Freddie began riding as an amateur he was left in no doubt as to what he should do," he says.


"And when he became world champion, well, proud isn't the word for it. I was absolutely  utterly, profoundly elated for him. The Fegenti series is such a wonderful grounding, you go to so many, different tracks, in different countries, ride on different tracks, in different conditions, learn different techniques - and it's all paid for.
"I took Freddie to Deauville for one of the races and it was all exactly as it was when I was on the circuit-the best hotels, lavish lunches and dinners. It brought it all back, all the fun I had.

"It's still a lot of fun, of course, even though the Epsom race is not included in the Fegenti series and Moet ended its association in 2001 when it lost television coverage. Indeed, the status of the amateurs' Derby has dwindled considerably since then and Richards  recognises the fact that the race no longer retains the sparkle of the original sponsor's product.
"It was very prestigious at one stage-anything with 'Derby' in it is going to have some sort of cachet that sets it apart, " he says,  "I'm sure it's still a great thing for the riders who take part, but it's not the same class of race at all. It used to mean a lot, but maybe not so much any more. It certainly meant a lot to Mitchell, and Richards, Henderson, Lord Oaksey and all the rest among the eclectic camaraderie in the Epsom changing room. Times change, tastes differ, but the 1974 vintage is still an intoxicating one. " 

Jockey Jack Mitchell | Record By Race Type | Racing Post


INTERNATIONAL HORSERACING 
Your adventure into the World of Global Horseracing

a warm welcome to Nicholas Godfrey (GB) (Racing Post)

By Jon Lees
“BART CUMMINGS universally regarded as the greatest trainer in Australian racing history,
died yesterday aged 87.
“The man who earned the mantle of the ‘Cups King’ thanks to his unparalleled record in
such races, including a record 12 Melbourne Cups, died peacefully surrounded by his family.
“The news was broken in the early hours of the morning local time by son Anthony, who
tweeted: “Dad died peacefully in his sleep surrounded by his family. He lived a full life.
“Cummings, who began training in 1953, won his latest Melbourne Cup in 2008, when
Viewed  denied the Luca Cumani trained hope Bauer in a photo finish.
“Cumani said last night: “Obviously he was a great man and his record was unsurpassed,
especially in the Melbourne Cup. He was one of the all-time greats anywhere in the world.
A great character too. We used to have a lot of chat and banter when I went out there. “I am
 very sad.”
"Aussie legend who won a record 12 Melbourne Cups" .
Obituary, Nicholas Godfrey pages 4 and 5.

  









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